Dick Freeman Ford's Theater Dick Freeman and frends Dick Freeman Presenting Lincoln

Programs

Lincoln's Faith

Abraham Lincoln began life on the frontier without real church opportunities, and as an adult was not a member of a specific church. Because of this, throughout the years many historians have alleged that he was not a Christian. This is not true. Lincoln’s mother and later his step-mother read him the Bible until he began to read it for himself. His deep knowledge of the Bible grew over the years and it profoundly changed him. In the play “Lincoln’s Faith”, Dick Freeman answers the question... Was Abraham Lincoln a Christian?

"Lincoln’s Faith” is a one-act play set in the White House on the night of Lincoln’s assassination, presented through the perspective of John Hay, Lincoln’s personal secretary. The play reviews Lincoln’s life and outlines his spiritual growth during his years as President. It highlights Lincoln’s conversion to Christianity in 1863-64 and offers personal glimpses where his faith was tested and increased. The play runs approximately 25-30 minutes with a separate question and answer session following the play.

The Life of Lincoln

Using the persona of John Hay, Dick Freeman presents the life of Abraham Lincoln from his birth in 1809 in a log cabin in the Kentucky wilderness through his assassination in April of 1865. The presentation can be tailored for different audiences, from elementary schools to civic groups, and can to run anywhere from 30 minutes to more than an hour and a half, depending on your needs. The presentation can be tailored to emphasize Lincoln’s lifelong dedication to self–education, his spiritual growth, or his leadership skills.

The Atlanta Campaign

The focus of this presentation is the Atlanta Campaign, and the importance of this pivotal battle to the United States to this very day. The presentation focuses on the military errors and the political and social aspects with respect to the battle in and around Peachtree Creek. The ripple effect down through history to this very day is revealed and what this country might well have become had Sherman not prevailed during the summer and fall of 1864.